the
feminist
seventies

edited by

helen graham
ann kaloski
ali neilson
emma robertson


 

ABOUT THE WEB BOOK
 
This free-to-access web book is part of a joint print and online publication that challenges thinking about 'seventies feminism'. You might find it useful to start with the Preface before moving on to read or listen to the other pieces.
 
Let us know what you think of this book, both content and format. This is our first web book: is this kind of web publishing a good idea?
 
More articles are available in the The Feminist Seventies print book, available from
Raw Nerve Books (opens in new browser)

These publications are also part of the Feminist Seventies Project (opens in new browser)


 

COPYRIGHT DETAILS
 
Copyright © Raw Nerve Books Limited
 
While copyright of the volume as a whole is invested in Raw Nerve Books Limited, copyright in the selection belongs to the editors and copyright in individual chapters belongs to their respective authors. No part of this book may be reprinted or reproduced or utilized in any form without the express permission in writing of both author and publisher. bibliographic details(opens in new browser)

First published in June 2003 by
Raw Nerve Books Limited, Centre for Womenís Studies, University of York, York YO10 5DD, England
www.rawnervebooks.co.uk
 
The authors have asserted their moral right to be identified as the authors of this work under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act, 1988.

British Library Cataloguing-in publication Data. A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library.
ISBN: 0-9536585-4-6
 
Dungaree image from an original drawing by Esperanza Miyake
 
Web book design by Ann Kaloski, to whom any queries or corrections should be sent.
email
 
acknowledgements(opens in new browser)

best viewed in IE 5 or above, or Netscape 6.2 or above.

  web book logo showing the back of a pair of dungarees

The Feminist Seventies Web Book

This is one of the publications that came out of the Feminist Seventies conference, held in York, England in April 2002. The original version of this book was published in 2003. In early 2006 the web site and files were lost, and this is a re-constituted version, or 2nd edition, of the book, published in April 2006. All of the written text was saved, thanks to the Wayback Machine service. However, the short sound extracts of the conference plenaries were lost. We have therefore added links to the corrresponding conference abstracts and to articles published in print form.

See other Feminist Seventies publications: print book :: pamphlet:: conference archives

 
 

CONTENTS

Preface to The Feminist Seventies print and web books
I the 1970s


'Then' and 'Now'

Kristyn Gorton
A New Time for Feminism: 'Then' and 'Now'

Gail Chester
Active Then, Active Now: Or, I still call myself a radical feminist' :: abstract opens in new browser

Sue Thomas
Travelling with Joni


Challenging the State

Myrtle Hill
Challenging the State We're In: The feminist seventies in `Troubled' Northern Ireland :: :: abstract opens in new browser.
See Hill's article in The Feminist Seventies print book

Jenny Wolmark
Experiences in the British Communist Party
The pleasure-pain of feminist politics in the 1970s

Women's Demands

Margaretta Jolly
Writing the web: Letters from the women's peace movement

ZoŽ Fairbairns
Saying What We Want: Women's Liberation and the Seven Demands :: abstract opens in new browser.
See Fairbairns' aticle in the pamphlet of the same name, or in The Feminist Seventies print book.

The Feminist Seventies interactive web site
Women Demand


Surprising Pleasures

Mary Eagleton
Re-reading the Seventies: Re-reading women's silence :: abstract opens in new browser
See Eagleton's article in The Feminist Seventies print book

Maria Vara
Forms of Agency in Women's Detective Fiction in the Seventies: Rereading P D James' An Unsuitable Job for a Woman (1972) and Muriel Spark's The Driver's Seat (1970)

Ann Kaloski
Desiring Feminism, Wanting Ch-ch-changes


The Eighties

Margaretta Jolly
Between seventies feminism and the third wave: A view from the eighties